.RU

Tools & Methods for Partnering - Hal Hamilton, Chris Landry, Daniella Malin, Don Seville, Susan Sweitzer Sustainable Food Lab

Tools & Methods for Partnering


Memorandum of Understanding


Tags and keywords:

Convening, governance, partnering, boundaries, documents

Context:

Engagement across organizations in a value chain, and/or between an NGO and value chain actors.

Description:

In the early stages of a partnership across organizations in a value chain, there can be a great deal of uncertainty and ambiguity. There may be a general understanding of why and how to work together, but important details may be unclear. This lack of clarity can be a barrier to the development of trust, which is critical to successful collaboration. For example, what are the goals? What is the scope and timeline of activity? What personnel and resources are needed from the organizations? How will joint activities be governed? What are the guidelines for confidentiality and information sharing among the partners and beyond?

Drafting a Memorandum of Understanding can be critical in setting the “container” for a trusting and effective relationship, for three reasons. First, the content of the document can clarify some of the initial ambiguities by preliminarily defining the goals, scope, timeline, resources, and governance for the partnership; this sets the stage for common language and routines among the people involved. Second, the MoU’s existence as a quasi-legal document allows people to refer back in case any disputes arise. The artifact provides for some basic assurance and accountability, an intermediate step on the way to trust. Finally, the process of drafting and committing to the document can be important in building trust – it may be the first shared endeavor and product to come out of two partners’ collaboration.

The particular content of the MoU will depend on the nature of the relationship and activities among the organizations. A few points are worth considering, however:

Example of Application:



Costco imports French-style green beans from Guatemala, which move through the Cuatro Pinos cooperative, and the Los Angeles Salad Company. To understand the impacts of green bean revenues on indigenous Guatemalan farmers, these organizations wanted to engage CIAT – a third party NGO – to conduct a value chain study. In the first phase of the partnership across these four organizations, a preliminary sense of agreement was developed through one-on-one conversations. Some concerns, however, particularly about information sharing around the study, still remained. To assuage these concerns, the organizations worked together to draft a Memorandum of Understanding that defined the goals, scope, timeline, resources, governance, and information sharing guidelines for the project. It specified a steering committee with specific representatives from each of the organizations and gave that committee the authority to define four tiers of information:

Although it took a few months to get the MoU signed, it provided the operating framework within which the Juan Francisco Project could proceed.

Additional Documents about this tool/method:



Mark Lundy Summary Report of the Juan Francisco Project: French_bean_summary_Final.pdf

Links to other tools, methods, cases:



Juan Francisco Project case, Page

57



3

rd

party NGO analysis of value chain, Page 81



Contacts for further information:



Mark Lundy, CIAT

Sheri Flies, Costco

Jason Jay, MIT

Don Seville, SFL

Communications partnership






Tags and keywords:

Method, partnership, collaboration, public relations, marketing, communications, alignment




Context:

This method description synthesizes from several cases in the Healthy Value Chains Network (Coke-WWF, Costco-CIAT, and Unilever-Rainforest Alliance), as well as general approaches to good cross-boundary collaboration.

Description:

Partnerships between companies and NGO's have a critical component of public relations, communications, and marketing. Both organizations can benefit from public awareness of their joint activities, but both also face risks. It is critical to manage expectations by key opinion formers, and to provide accurate information about activities and impacts without disclosing confidential or proprietary information. In order to manage communication, the following lessons and methods might help:




Example of Application:



Certifying Lipton tea with the Rainforest Alliance standards is a significant undertaking and investment by both Unilever and the Rainforest Alliance.  Part of the engagement between the two organizations is a communications partnership.  Rainforest Alliance has a network of communications professionals in Europe, some of whom happen to be located near the major Unilever offices, and who are tasked with reviewing PR materials from Unilever about the certification process.  Gradually the interaction between these teams has evolved from reviewing completed documents, to early review and co-authoring documents, to an increasing confidence in the consistency and integrity of each other's messaging.




Additional Documents about this tool/method:






Links to other tools, methods, cases:



Case Study - Certifying Lipton Tea



Case Study – The Juan Francisco Project



Case Study – Coke-WWF



Contacts for further information:



Jason Jay, MIT

Lettemieke Mulder, Unilever
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • © sanaalar.ru
    Образовательные документы для студентов.